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Creation of One Nursing Regulator in NS

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On October 4th, 2016, CRNNS and CLPNNS announced plans to create one new nursing regulator for the province of Nova Scotia. This decision, approved by the CRNNS Council and the CLPNNS Board, is a historic decision that will enable the staff and boards of both organizations to join together to strengthen our commitment to Nova Scotians through an enhanced consistent, efficient and collaborative approach to nursing regulation.

Stay tuned to our emails and newsletters for all developments and stay tuned to this page of our website for the latest information.

Summer 2017 Newsletter

The Creation of One Nursing Regulator Rolls On!

Joint Boards Take Steps to Enhance Collaboration

While summer is usually a time dedicated to vacations and fun in the sun, board members from the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia (CLPNNS) and the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) are pretty excited about their continued plans to create one nursing regulator in Nova Scotia.

“This is a really groundbreaking opportunity for nursing regulation not only in our province but across the country,” says CLPNNS Board Chair, Jason Reeves. “It’s work that we take to heart because of the impact we know the new regulator can have on the lives of many Nova Scotians. We feel a sense of pride in the work we’re conducting with CRNNS and working collaboratively has definitely strengthened the bond we feel as a team. We already see that this is elevating the work we do at the governance level.”

The boards of CLPNNS and CRNNS have begun to introduce joint meetings into their existing schedules that enable them to discuss matters related to the creation of one nursing regulator as a team. While joint meetings have led to a more holistic approach, the independent decision-making authority of each College is still being maintained. And this work will continue throughout the summer as the joint boards further develop their plans to govern the future regulator.

“It is still of vital importance that the CLPNNS Board and the CRNNS Council each continue to meet the requirements in our current respective Acts and Regulations. However we can learn from one another by building cohesion as a team as we currently exist,” explains Ruth Whelan, CRNNS Council President. “We know that our collective members – LPNs, RNs and NPs – work collaboratively on a daily basis and the ability for board members and staff of each College to do the same means that we will be able to enhance the work we do on behalf of Nova Scotians.”

The boards found it especially helpful to collaboratively look at their due diligence work. This process was a long and detailed investigative process that enabled each College to confidentially access one another’s records and information. The purpose of analyzing the information was to assess any possible risks of joining as one body and the boards were pleased to find no unforeseen information that would require a change in course of action.

How can you have your say? CLPNNS and CRNNS just issued a survey to all members and we look forward to sharing those results with you soon. We’ve also got more stakeholder consultations expected to begin in the fall so stay tuned!


Previous Announcements

To ensure you haven’t missed any of the information shared to date, please refer to the following updates that captures all material previously shared.

Stakeholder Survey: Tell us Your Thoughts!

The College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia (CLPNNS) and the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) currently regulate the practice of nurses in order to protect and serve the public interest of Nova Scotians. We are joining forces to create one nursing regulator for licensed practical nurses, registered nurses and nurse practitioners in Nova Scotia.

In order to enhance the work the new regulator will do on behalf of the public, we want to hear from our stakeholders and members. Your input plays an important role in shaping the new regulator. While we have plans to engage with stakeholders and members throughout the process, your input at this early stage is key.

Please take a few minutes to provide us with your thoughts by responding to the following questions. All of your responses are anonymous and will be incorporated into a report that will be made available on crnns.ca and clpnns.ca. If you have any questions about the survey or would like to confirm its validity, you may contact Jane Wilson, Communication Consultant, CRNNS at jwilson@formationteam.ca.

This survey closes on July 6th, 2017.

When you are ready to begin please click on the link to get started: novascotianurses.ca

May 2017 Newsletter

We recently sat down with Ann Mann, Executive Director of the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia (CLPNNS) and Sue Smith, CEO of the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) to speak with them about the work underway to create one nursing regulator for Nova Scotians. We wanted to know more about the motivation behind this historic undertaking and how this idea came about. What are the benefits of one regulator? What does this mean for Nova Scotians and nurses across the province and what do they envision for the future regulatory body? Check out their interview to learn more.

Interview with Ann Mann and Sue Smith

Ann Mann and Sue SmithBringing two organizations together can’t be a simple undertaking. What is behind the consideration to create one nursing regulator in Nova Scotia?

Ann: You’re right it’s not going to be simple, which is why so much thought was put into determining if this was the right decision of our organizations. This work all came about a couple of years ago when one of our CLPNNS Board members asked if Nova Scotians might be better served by one nursing regulator as opposed to two. And we had to really consider this question because upholding the safety of the public through our work in nursing regulation is our reason for being. It’s why we exist. So, it was a fantastic question to ask and a real demonstration of what self-regulation is all about.

Sue: The beauty of all of this is that each of our organizations share the same purpose so it made perfect sense for us to both to really unpack this question. Our boards started the work of gathering and analyzing the research and felt confident that their ultimate decision to create one new body was grounded in sound evidence. It’s groundbreaking for sure and we’re mindful of the road ahead of us but we’re ready to embrace the opportunities we know will exist in our new collaborative future.

So what exactly do you hope to achieve and what do you see for the future?

Sue: Well, that’s a pretty big question but I’ll start by saying that we think that we have an opportunity to transform nursing regulation by being more flexible and nimble in the future. We are 100% committed to being open and to creating a new organization that looks for opportunities. We strongly believe that this will enable us to find new ways to add value for our stakeholders and to improve processes to the extent and manner that we can. Having said that, this won’t change our core work. We’re in the business of protecting the public and we will still do this, how we do it may look different in the future – we don’t that know yet – but the core elements of our work will remain.

Ann: I think the most exciting part of this process is that we don’t see this as work that will be happening alone. We see our members and other stakeholders as key to this process. They engage with us every day so we want them to tell us…what can we improve on? What might we do to simplify things? What is working well that we can learn from and apply in other areas? We would be doing ourselves and our stakeholders a disservice if we believed that we alone had the answers to these questions. So we plan to engage people throughout this process and we see members from each college as an important part of this work. It’s this work that is going to help shape the new regulator. So everybody should stay tuned!

It might be too early to know the full benefits of becoming one regulator but you must expect some in order to undertake this work in the first place. Can you share what those are?

Ann: Absolutely. We see that coming together as one regulating body will reduce what could be perceived as a siloed or fractured approach to regulation. It will allow the new body to take a more holistic approach to regulation for the whole nursing profession. It’s too early to tell this from where we sit now but we might expect to find some operational efficiencies and economies of scale as we progress as well.

Sue: As Ann mentioned earlier, there’s a lot yet to be determined about our future state and that’s because we truly want the new regulator to be built upon the feedback of our stakeholders. So we don’t have a lot of preconceived notions about what that will look like. Having said that, we can confidently say the creation of one body will mean there’s one single point of contact for the public who don’t always differentiate between the three nursing designations now. We also see value in the ability to speak, when appropriate, with one voice with the public and other stakeholders. Really, this process of discovery, if you will, through engaging with stakeholders is a significant benefit as well.

Ann: And you will hear us talk a lot about “oneness”, which is easy to do when you’re creating one new body but we want to be clear that the roles of LPNs, NPs and RNs will remain unique and distinct as they are today.

Sue: Nurses work collaboratively within the health care system to provide safe and quality care to clients. Coming together to create one nursing regulator will allow us, as regulators, to model that same spirit of collaboration.

How is progress going and what’s happening next?

Sue: Things are definitely moving ahead and our progress is going well. We’re well into our planning phase now and have been spending a significant amount of time focused on the process that will allow us to develop the legislation we’ll need to have in place.

Ann: That’s really a huge piece of this. We just recently met with the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness and we were delighted to come away from that meeting with their support for the plan and an agreement to collaborate on building the new legislation together. Our goal is to develop legislation and new processes that allow us to stay current and nimble as a regulator. So we’re really looking forward to that work taking place.

Sue: We’re also preparing the two organizations to be ready for when the legislation is proclaimed even though this isn’t happening for a while yet. This is a significant undertaking and a big change so we want to take the time to do this right and gathering input from our stakeholders and collaborating with others is key.

So, have you got an end date in mind?

Ann: It’s really too difficult to say right now because we’re learning more about this process every day. It’s also not work that we’re doing alone so our timeline includes a lot of variables. We like to believe that the best case scenario would see the new regulator in place in 2019 but we’ll have a better idea of those timelines as we continue down this road.

I don’t want to put anybody on the spot here but I’m doing the math. I’m sitting across from the two of you as leaders of the two colleges that exist today and we’re looking at just one organization ahead. Any leadership secrets you care to share?

Ann: Even we don’t know that yet! I think it’s safe to say that we’re quite certain there will be just one CEO or Executive Director for the new regulator but we’re a long way off from those types of decisions.

Sue: That really goes to show you that we have no crystal ball! I have to say that I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to work more closely with Ann and her team throughout this process. We have developed a great partnership that is only strengthening our work at hand.

Ann: I couldn’t agree more, Sue. It’s been a pleasure for me as well. So, to answer your question, we have no secrets. We have a lot of work to do, we want to engage with our stakeholders, keep people informed, and build an innovative and responsive regulator that will serve us well into the future.

All members will have an opportunity to provide feedback about the creation of the new nursing regulator and we will be finalizing those engagement plans shortly. As always, please stay tuned to your newsletters, our website and Facebook for more details. We’ll share the latest information with you there and we look forward to working with you.


January 2017 Eblast to Stakeholders

As of January 16th, a new Formation Team was established to lead and coordinate the development and implementation of the transition work for the new regulatory body. We expect that team to be in place for approximately two years and to work solely on the creation of the new organization. Here are members of the team, comprised of both CLPNNS and CRNNS staff members:

Teri Crawford, Team Lead (Teri will also remain as the CEO designate in those instances when Sue Smith is unavailable)
902.423.8782 ext. 236
tcrawford@formationteam.ca

Shelley Farouse, Executive Assistant
902.423.8782 ext. 255
sfarouse@formationteam.ca

Peter Murray, Regulatory Advisor (Peter will also maintain some duties related to the LPN national exam (CPNRE))
902.423.8782 ext. 261
pmurray@formationteam.ca

Anjana Tomchuk, Project Manager
902.423.8782 ext. 251
atomchuk@formationteam.ca

Heather Totton, Regulatory Advisor
902.423.8782 ext. 260
htotton@formationteam.ca

It is important to all of us at CRNNS that we maintain our obligation to protect the public while ensuring we are fully committed to the creation of one nursing regulator. As a result of the shift in responsibilities, new individuals have been appointed to ensure the day-to-day operation remains stable and consistent with service delivery expectations. The following individuals have assumed the following roles:

Doug Bungay, Director of Professional Practice and Policy (CLPNNS) and Acting Director of Policy, Practice & Legislation Services (CRNNS)
902.491.9744 ext. 242 / 800.565.9744 ext. 242
doug@clpnns.ca or dbungay@crnns.ca

Darlene Martin, Acting Executive Assistant
902.491.9744 ext. 223 / 800.565.9744 ext. 223
dmartin@crnns.ca

Elizabeth Parenteau, Acting Manager for Professional Conduct
902.491.9744 ext. 291 / 800.565.9744 ext. 291
eparenteau@crnns.ca

Paula Prendergast, Acting Manager for Registration Services (Paula will maintain her role with the Education Advisory Committee)
902.491.9744 ext. 244 / 800.565.9744 ext. 244
pprendergast@crnns.ca

Our goal is to manage this transition with as little disruption to all of our stakeholders as possible and we look forward to sharing more information with all of you as developments occur.


December 2016 Newsletter
History in the Making

The Board of CLPNNS and the Council of CRNNS have recently approved a formal agreement that will enable both colleges to move forward with plans to create one nursing regulator that will regulate the practice of LPNs, RNs and NPs for the province of Nova Scotia.

This historic decision enables CLPNNS and CRNNS to join together to strengthen their commitment to the public through an enhanced consistent, efficient and collaborative approach to nursing regulation.

What does this mean to Nova Scotians and to our members? What’s happening next and when can you expect to hear more? We’re committed to keeping members informed throughout the process and we wanted to start by introducing you to the board leaders for each college. Check out this video featuring the Chair of CLPNNS and the President of CLPNNS.

March 2016 Newsletter

Potential Move to One Nursing Regulator
Feasibility Study Update

Last fall and again early in the New Year, we told you about the feasibility study that would explore the possible move to one nursing regulator in Nova Scotia. What’s the point of a feasibility study you might wonder? Well, it’s an analysis of the viability of one nursing regulator. The study will help the boards of the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) and the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia (CLPNNS) determine if there are grounds to explore a joint venture.

CRNNS and CLPNNS are committed to investigating the potential value of moving to one nursing regulator and to better understand what the potential opportunities and risks may be. Hearing from the public, our members and other stakeholders in the nursing community is an important component of this work, which is why we’re appreciative of those who have taken the time to share their feedback.

Both colleges have been busy the last few months gathering feedback from stakeholders to inform the feasibility study. A survey was sent to all members via email for their input. The responses gathered will be part of an interim report that is due at the end of April and results will be shared with members. No decision has been made – or will be made without a full and robust exploration of the issue.

While there is still much work to be done, we want to make it clear to all nurses in Nova Scotia that moving to one regulator, if feasible, would bring together the boards and staff of the two colleges that oversee the practice of LPNs, RNs, and NPs in Nova Scotia. It would not change existing nursing roles and each category of nursing would remain distinct, each with their own standards and scopes of practice as they are now.

The CRNNS Council and staff would like to extend thanks to all members for your input and interest in this work. We are committed to sharing information with you as developments occur and we look forward to sharing the results of the feedback gathered around the end of April.

As always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us if you have any questions or concerns about this initiative. You can reach Shelley Farouse, CRNNS Executive Assistant, by email at sfarouse@crnns.ca.


News Articles

October 4, 2016: Creation of One Nursing Regulator in Nova Scotia

April 25, 2016: Joint Statement from CLPNNS and CRNNS

January 6, 2016: CLPNNS/CRNNS Feasibility Study Re Potential Move to One Nursing Regulatory Body – Progress Update

October 22, 2015: Early Discussions on Potential Move to One Nursing Regulator in Nova Scotia

Other Notifications

2015 Annual Report


We encourage you to let us know if you have any questions by contacting info@crnns.ca and we would be happy to get back to you.

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